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How to Know If You’re at Risk for Glaucoma

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How to Know If You’re at Risk for Glaucoma

happy senior outside 640×350Glaucoma is a dangerous eye condition that can cause blindness. The condition occurs when fluids in the eye put pressure on the optic nerve. It is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, with more than 3 million cases in North America alone.

By testing your vision, dilating your pupils, examining your eyes, and testing your eye pressure, Dr. John Jacobi can detect whether you have glaucoma. Additional tests can determine whether your peripheral vision has declined.

Because glaucoma’s early stages affect the peripheral nerves in your retina, your side vision is damaged before your central vision. Furthermore, as this nerve damage is almost always pain-free, often this condition is discovered only after causing irreversible vision loss. While glaucoma’s effects can be managed, its damage is permanent.

Be Aware of the Risk Factors

You should be alert to the dangers of glaucoma, especially if you:

  • are over 40 years old
  • are African American or Hispanic
  • have diabetes, heart disease, sickle cell anemia, or high blood pressure
  • have a family history of glaucoma
  • sustained an eye injury
  • have extreme nearsightedness or farsightedness
  • have used corticosteroid medications
  • notice any vision loss

How Do I Know if I Have Glaucoma?

Contact Dr. John Jacobi at Low Vision Center At Suburban Eye Care, who will dilate the pupil of your eyes and perform a comprehensive eye examination to determine whether you have the condition. If you do, we will start treatment immediately, usually by prescribing eye medications to prevent the glaucoma from worsening, and schedule follow-up visits.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends getting a thorough dilated eye exam by age 40 to catch glaucoma and other eye diseases early.

Other proactive steps the CDC advises to prevent glaucoma include:

  • maintaining a healthy weight
  • monitoring your blood pressure
  • staying active
  • not smoking

 

Low Vision Center At Suburban Eye Care treats patients with glaucoma — and people at risk for it — in Metro Detroit, Plymouth, Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and throughout Michigan.

References

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The 3rd Person in the Exam Room

adult woman with senior womanSee if you can relate this: Many of the people who enter our offices seeking low vision care do so with a mixture of anxiety and trepidation. By the time we see them they will have already tried over-the-counter reading glasses, a variety of routine eyeglass prescriptions, hand-held magnifiers, and probably retinal treatments and AREDS vitamins — often to no avail.

Not only has their vision not improved, but they have been repeatedly told by their physician that “nothing more can be done,” at least from a medical perspective.

Eager for solutions, they reach out to Low Vision Center At Suburban Eye Care to give it one more try, often accompanied by a friend or loved one.

We recognize how important it is for many patients to have a “3rd person in the exam room.” Having a support person can be invaluable for the patient, in a variety of ways, by providing emotional support and guidance during and after visits to the practice. This support person can be a significant other, spouse, partner, adult child, aide, or caregiver.

Reasons to Have a Support Person Present at the Low Vision Evaluation

There are many reasons for having that third person in the room. One of them is the familiarity that helps calm the patient’s anxieties. Furthermore, even if a patient’s memory is intact, they rarely remember all the suggestions and recommendations discussed during the doctor’s visit — something a support person can help with.

The support person may be able to fill in any missing information regarding the patient’s visual needs and medical history if the patient isn’t able to do so.

Accompanying the patient to exams can give the support person a deeper understanding of the patient’s visual capabilities and limitations. They may be dismayed at the patient’s poor vision during the eye chart testing or elated to discover that the patient has usable vision that can be enhanced with the use of low vision aids and devices.

The “3rd person” can act as a cheerleader, encouraging the patient to try activities they thought were beyond their visual abilities. They can encourage the patient to try telescope glasses or read small print using a microscopic lens.

The support person can also help and remind the patient to correctly follow the instructions when using the low vision aids by, for example, ensuring the patient is holding the reading material at the correct reading distance and situating the desk lamp for maximum benefit and brightness.

Bring a Support Person to Your Next Low Vision Consultation

To ensure the best outcome, we highly recommend that patients invite a support person to join them for their vision evaluations and consultations with Dr. John Jacobi.

To learn more about how Low Vision Center At Suburban Eye Care can help low vision patients make the most of their vision, please contact Dr. John Jacobi today, or go to our website at https://www.suburbaneyecare.com/eye-care-services/low-vision-optometrist/.

We serve low vision patients from Metro Detroit, Plymouth, Ann Arbor,Dearborn, all throughout Michigan.

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Reading Tips For Those With Macular Degeneration

Woman 1.7FD w Cap.KinkadeThe most serious symptom of macular degeneration (AMD) is the loss of central vision, with those in the more advanced stages of AMD experiencing a smudge or black spot in the center of their vision. This makes it difficult to read and causes many people to give up on reading.

It doesn’t have to be this way.

Below you will find a list of low vision devices and strategies that can help people with AMD read more easily and comfortably.

Members of The International Academy of Low Vision Specialists are experts in determining which low vision devices will work best for you for reading.

Low Vision Devices for Reading

Reading Magnifier

Hand-held magnifiers are the most commonly used visual aids for spot reading among those with AMD and other low vision conditions. In the correct power, they are useful for reading medicine bottles, prices, labels, oven dials, etc. While you can find small pocket magnifiers, full-page illuminated magnifiers, and magnifiers that are mounted on adjustable stands, only your low vision doctor can determine exactly what power you need.

Portable Electronic Magnifiers

A portable electronic magnifier resembles an iPad or a tablet. By holding this device in front of your reading material, you can view the magnified version on its LED screen.

High-Power Reading Glasses

Strong magnifying reading eyeglasses enable a person with severe visual impairment to read the fine print. Your low vision eye doctor will determine the correct near prescription and demonstrate how they work.

Video Magnifier

Although traditional optical magnifiers, such as magnifying glasses, are generally very helpful, some people benefit more from a video magnifier. A video magnifier, or closed-circuit television (CCTV), has a camera that transmits magnified images (up to 50x or higher) and displays them on a large monitor or TV screen. You can sit as close to the screen as you like and adjust the magnification, brightness, and contrast for reading clarity.

Tele-Microscopic Glasses

Tele-microscopic lenses are mounted on the eyeglass lenses and may be prescribed for one or both eyes. They allow people with low vision to read, use a computer, write, and perform other tasks at a comfortable distance.

Certain low vision devices require a prescription from an eye doctor as they are custom-made for your specific needs. Consult Dr. John Jacobi, who will help determine which vision aids are best for your needs, based on your lifestyle and level of vision impairment.

Other Strategies To Help You Read With Macular Degeneration

Increase in Contrast

It’s important to ensure a stark contrast between the text being read and its background. Newspapers don’t offer much contrast because the grey letters sit on an off-white background.

Many electronic screens allow you to tailor the contrast to your needs: black lettering on a white background; white lettering on a black background; black lettering on a yellow background; and yellow lettering on a dark black background. Try the different color combinations and settle on the color contrast combination that offers the best contrast for the most comfortable reading experience.

Increase Lighting

Increasing the amount and type of lighting can greatly improve reading ability in those with AMD.

Direct light. A standard table lamp usually won’t provide sufficient light for reading a book. Consider getting an adjustable gooseneck lamp that allows you to focus the light directly onto the reading material.

Sunlight. Because natural sunlight is the ideal lighting for reading, try to arrange your furniture in such a way that you can sit near a window for comfortable daytime reading.

Lightbulbs. Use the brightest light bulbs for each light fixture in the house. These include LED, halogen, and full-spectrum light bulbs (which mimics natural sunlight more than incandescent bulbs). Be careful with halogen, however, as they may create excessive heat. Replace any fluorescent lighting in the house, as it can cause glare, particularly for those with low vision. For reading, however, the best option is to use lower strength light bulbs and bring the lamp closer.

E-reader. Kindles and other e-readers conveniently include a built-in light that allows you to adjust brightness for more comfortable reading.

Large Print Books or Larger Fonts

Consider purchasing large print books online or in book shops, as they include larger fonts, more spacing and better contrast. If you opt for electronic books, you can conveniently increase the font size, rendering it easier and more enjoyable to read.

Adjust Spacing

Your electronic reading device allows you to adjust the spacing between the lines as needed. By widening the space between lines, you will find reading easier and will experience less eye strain.

Speak with Dr. John Jacobi for more advice on reading with macular degeneration or to get low vision aids and devices.

Low Vision Center At Suburban Eye Care serves low vision patients in Metro Detroit, Plymouth, Ann Arbor, and Dearborn, throughout Michigan.

 

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Why All Low Vision Patients Are Upset

Bifocal Type R.By Richard J. Shuldiner, OD, FAAO, FIALVS, Chief Clinical Editor

In 1960, at the age of seven, Wayne F. was diagnosed with amblyopia in his left eye (commonly referred to as Lazy Eye), but it was left untreated. As an adult, Wayne scheduled regular eye exams every few years and received new glasses each time the vision in his right eye changed. In November of 2019, it was time to renew his driver’s license. During all previous DMV visits, Wayne could read the vision charts with the help of glasses. This trip was different.

How Wayne Suddenly Became a Low Vision Patient

Wayne’s vision had slowly deteriorated to the point where the DMV eye chart became impossible to read, and, to his surprise, his license was revoked. Wayne scheduled an appointment with his eye doctor to get new glasses. He expected that a new prescription would improve his vision enough to get his driver’s license reinstated. It also seemed like an opportunity to get new frames and a new look. That’s when Wayne received the news that dry macular degeneration had developed in his right eye, and that new glasses would not improve his vision. He was told, “Nothing more can be done.”

Wayne was devastated. Confusion and worry took over as he asked himself, “How will I get to work? How will I pay the mortgage? How will I support my family? What will become of me?”

Low Vision Patients Have a Reason to Be Upset

ALL low vision patients are upset. Every one of them. And it doesn’t matter if they have a happy disposition, a good attitude or have “accepted” it. They are upset.

As we know, Wayne is not alone. Many patients are struggling with the shocking news that new glasses will not restore their vision. Loss of vision is one of the major fears that people have. When it happens, the upset can be truly debilitating.

Definition of Low Vision

What exactly is “low vision”? There are many ways to say it, but for me, this is the most understandable: Best corrected vision is insufficient to do what you want to do.

The definition contains two variables: vision and task— the amount of vision available to work with, and the tasks the patient wants to be able to do. A person with no visual goals does not have low vision, regardless of the extent of vision loss.

What Is it Like?

Consider the plight of most of the low vision patients we see. They have had decent vision for most of their lives. They needed glasses at some point, for any of the refractive reasons, including presbyopia. Some solved their conditions with glasses, others with contact lenses, vision therapy, or a surgical procedure. In each case, these solutions enabled them to see well enough to do what they wanted to do.

Now, after scores of eye examinations over the years, they once again don’t see well. Still confident that their vision can be corrected, they make an appointment with clear expectations and intentions: stylish new frames, better contacts, clearer vision to enjoy life and be productive. After all, they’ve been through this many times. Only this time, it doesn’t happen.

Instead, they are told they have an “eye condition” that has caused them to lose vision permanently!

And, they are told that if there is a treatment, it won’t bring back the vision they have lost!

And, they may lose more vision!

And it could happen at any time!

And they might go blind!

And lastly, they are told, “There’s nothing more we can do!”

Each sentence stabs like a knife.

What Being Upset Is All About

Surprisingly, there are only three things that upset human beings.

  • Unfulfilled expectations
  • Thwarted intentions
  • Undelivered communications

Think about any time you have ever been upset. Regardless of the circumstances, regardless of who you think was to blame, regardless of what “they” did, regardless of the topic or whom it was with, the upset falls into one or more of the above three categories.

No one expects to lose vision permanently.

No one expects to hear these words from their eye doctor: “There’s nothing more that can be done.”

The expectation is that the doctor will have a solution to the problem.

The intention is to get new glasses, see better, get new frames and have a new, fashionable look.

They walk out in a daze, unable to communicate or even think clearly.

Upset Reactions

Three things happen to a human being when they become upset:

  • A shift in reality
  • A loss of affinity
  • A decrease in communication

Everyone knows not to make decisions when upset. Why? Because the shift in perception of reality leads to bad decisions. We’ve all experienced a reduction in both love and appreciation when we are upset with a loved one. And, we all know that getting someone to open up and communicate when they are upset is nearly impossible.

Words From an Eye Doctor

Life is full of unexpected and upsetting events and, like a flash of lightning, life can change in an instant. An event, such as being told you have Macular Degeneration (or some other vision-affecting eye condition) and that new glasses won’t help, becomes so upsetting that clear thinking is virtually impossible. What I’ve seen over the years while working with low vision patients is a state of chaos, of not knowing what to do, who to turn to, and how to deal with permanent vision loss. Confusion and fear take over as people have no idea what their lives will be like or what they should do.

Providing a Future

When faced with “going blind,” all the hopes and dreams of the future seem to be destroyed. The idea of having time to read great novels, travel to see famous sights, watch the grandchildren play their sports, and more is crushed in their minds. The future they have imagined is gone.

This is where low vision care comes in. People need a future to live into. Dr. John Jacobi can give them that and reduce the turmoil they feel.

We are telling our patients today: “There is life after vision loss. There are low vision doctors who can help to keep you doing those things you love. Your life is not over.”

Advanced LOW VISION CARE is available at Low Vision Center At Suburban Eye Care and a fulfilling life is attainable. Low vision glasses (i.e. telescopes, microscopes, prismatics, filters, etc.), low vision devices, adaptive technology, large print materials, and auxiliary professionals, such as Occupational Therapists and Orientation/Mobility specialists are available. Dr. John Jacobi is a member of the International Academy of Low Vision Specialists and has years of experience treating and caring for low vision patients.

This article first appeared here: https://emailactivity1.ecn5.com/engines/publicPreview.aspx?blastID=2606173&emailID=387066764

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Vision Loss After a Stroke

Imagine being a mother of two teenage daughters living on a farm. Think of how self-reliant you need to be, attending the house, the horses and the farmland. Whenever you leave the farm you need a car, whether for shopping or taking your daughters to the doctor.

And then one day, in your mid-40s a stroke takes away your independence. Even though you physically recover, vision loss leaves you with limited abilities and driving is out of the question.

Referral to a Low Vision Optometrist

This happened to the sister of an ophthalmologist, who had done everything an eye surgeon could help. Being a caring brother, he then referred her to a low vision optometrist and this is how she arrived at the practice of Dr. Jacobi.

“She was just beside herself,” said Dr. Jacobi, looking back. The woman was suffering from visual field loss as a result of the damage the stroke had done to the left side of her brain. She could only see one half of her visual field even though she was looking straight ahead.

The tricky part is, people with vision loss usually do not realize that they are missing part of their visual field. As a result, they have difficulty moving around without bumping into doorways and objects, or even people. Routine tasks, such as eating become challenging, as these people may not see half of their plates.

How Can You Drive If You Have Vision Loss?

For this lady, the most devastating impact of her vision loss was that she could no longer drive. “We made some very special glasses to address the fact that she couldn’t see to her left. [With these glasses] we shifted all the visual field. We gave most of it back to her – enough so she could drive,” said Dr. Jacobi.

Dr. Jacobi describes side vision awareness glasses, specifically designed for people who lost one side of their visual field, which often happens after a stroke. Side vision awareness glasses expand their visual field, enabling them to see on both sides. With the expanded field of vision, people regain confidence in navigating around and function independently.

Regaining and Maintaining Independence With Vision Loss

On route to regain independence and confidence, Dr. Jacobi suggested that she try her new glasses while riding her lawnmower before she got into her car. For a few months, she then roamed around the farm on her lawnmower, practicing driving with the new glasses and becoming aware of her side vision again.

Fifteen years have passed since then, and she is still successfully driving her car with the help of side vision awareness glasses every day. She also regularly mows the lawn.

If an eye doctor tells you there is nothing more he/she can do, consult Dr. John Jacobi, OD, FCOVD, member of the International Academy of Low Vision Specialists (IALVS) and owner of Suburban Eye Care. There may be a special kind of glasses to help you regain and maintain your independence despite vision loss.

Is It Possible to Read and Write With Macular Degeneration?

man reading a newspaper 3393375Once you’ve been diagnosed with macular degeneration, you may find yourself overwhelmed with questions. The uncertainty as to whether you will be able to read, write, and recognize faces can be depressing. Before you let these concerns weigh you down, contact a low vision optometrist, such as at , dedicated to helping macular degeneration patients live independent, fulfilling lives.

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The Importance of Vision in Daily Tasks

“To help a person do what he or she wants to do” is the central idea behind the work of every low vision optometrist. Our goal is to enable patients to carry out activities that are important to them. The ability to engage in daily tasks concerns patients with macular degeneration the most, as many routine activities, such as reading and writing, rely on central vision.

Reading With Macular Degeneration

Think about how often throughout the day you use your eyes to read labels, street signs, bills, or restaurant menus.

With the loss of central vision, reading can become a true challenge. The good news is that there are devices that can enable you to read again, even with macular degeneration.

Writing With Macular Degeneration

Your grandchildren are about to come for dinner, and you want to cook their favorite dish. First, you need to write the shopping list to buy the necessary groceries. And maybe you want to leave a note for your spouse on the fridge to let them know you went shopping.

With the help of low vision glasses provided by an IALVS optometrist, an eye doctor with advanced training in treating patients with vision loss, you can write shopping lists, sign checks, or fill in your favorite crossword puzzles.

Recognizing Faces With Macular Degeneration

Reading and writing are technical tasks. However, central vision loss due to macular degeneration can have an emotional impact as well. Being able to see the delighted smiles on your grandchildren’s faces when you serve them their favorite dish can bring tremendous joy.

IALVS optometrists understand the emotional impact of vision loss and will address your concerns with compassion. will work to maximize your vision every step of the way, so you can continue to enjoy looking into the eyes of your loved ones.

What Type of Low Vision Glasses Do You Need?

Different types of low vision glasses enable macular degeneration patients to accomplish the tasks mentioned above. These include telescopic, microscopic, and prismatic reading glasses.

Prismatic glasses and microscopic glasses are designed for reading and writing. Both types provide the wearer with clear vision at a close range. Thanks to these lenses, you can continue to engage in the activities you enjoy, such as play cards, knit sweaters, or build airplane models.

For face recognition, a low vision optometrist may recommend telescopic lenses. These help you clearly see things at a far distance — such as the face of a child walking towards you from the front gate.

Consult a Low Vision Optometrist

The three essential tasks for which vision is paramount can be helped with a variety of low vision aids and devices. Consult a low vision optometrist, such as at , who can enable you to engage in a variety of other tasks on your wishlist.

serves patients in Metro Detroit, Plymouth, Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and throughout Michigan.

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I Have Best Disease. Will I Be Able to Drive?

driving with best diseaseThis question reflects the primary concern of almost every patient with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. The genetic disorder affects central vision, which is vital to reading road signs, seeing traffic lights, and detecting emergencies while driving.

“The thing to know about this disease is that it does not progress to severe vision loss”, says our IALVS colleague and low vision optometrist, Dr. Robert Stamm. Almost all of his patients, he says, can be helped with bioptic telescope glasses. “They can be very efficient, safe, and effective for drivers and help keep their independence through most of their lives with this disease”.

There Are Good Chances for Driving With Best Disease

In most states, low vision optometrists can help you obtain your driver’s license. If you already have a license, but recently experienced a deterioration in your vision, we may be able to help you stay behind the wheel with the help of innovative low vision glasses, custom made to your prescription. Bioptic telescope lenses enable people to keep driving for most of their lives with Best disease.

If you have been told that you won’t be able to drive because your vision does not meet the legal requirements, you should consult a low vision optometrist near you, such as Dr. John Jacobi. Best disease is a rare condition, and not every eye doctor can help guide you on the laws and devices or custom optics that allow you to drive again.

Driving With the Help of Bioptic Telescope Lenses

Bioptic telescope glasses help people with low vision drive and perform many other vital tasks. These low vision glasses combine your regular prescription lenses on the bottom with telescopic prescription lenses on top. The regular lenses are called the “carrier lens”. The second set of lenses are much smaller and provide high magnification, making an object appear larger and closer, so it is easier to see.

Driving while wearing bioptic telescopes is easy; almost anyone can get used to them. Most of the time, you will be looking through the carrier lenses. As you approach a traffic sign you will be able to read it through the telescopic lenses. All you need is to slightly tilt your head down and focus on the sign to read.

Is Driving With Vision Loss Allowed?

Most states permit driving with the assistance of advanced optics, such as bioptic telescopes. However, the regulations vary according to each state and province. A low vision optometrist can assist you in understanding the rules that pertain to you and help you through the process.

You will generally need to reach a certain level of visual acuity with or without glasses to obtain a driver’s license. The minimum vision requirement varies. In some states, bioptic glasses are mandatory from a specific level.

Check out the local driving laws and regulations here: https://www.ialvs.com/dmv-driving-laws/, or simply contact your nearest low vision optometrist at Low Vision Center At Suburban Eye Care.

What Does a Low Vision Optometrist Have to Do With Driving?

Low vision optometrists are familiar with the visual requirements for obtaining a driver’s license. They also know which low vision aids can be used for driving and have the chance of achieving the desired visual acuity for you. Dr. John Jacobi will examine your eyesight and can maximize your remaining vision.

We work with each patient individually to establish the tasks they wish to accomplish. The next step is to assess and determine which devices and optics can help them reach those goals. Many patients are able to continue driving after working with a low vision optometrist.

Are you concerned about driving or carrying out another activity you value? Contact IALVS optometrist, Dr. John Jacobi, at Low Vision Center At Suburban Eye Care today for a consultation. Schedule a low vision exam to get your personal assessment and let us help you optimize your remaining vision.

Low Vision Center At Suburban Eye Care serves low vision patients from Metro Detroit, Plymouth, Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and throughout Michigan.

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His world was shattered when his twin brother told him he decided to get married and would leave the house. The two had been living together all their lives and he could not imagine being left on his own.

Both had the same eye condition, Ocular Albinism, which left them with partial vision. Because his vision was more severely impaired than that of his brother, he relied on his brother for driving and other daily activities.

An Idea That Would Change His Life

The engaged twin brother was concerned about leaving his brother on his own and came up with the idea to consult Dr. Jacobi. He hoped that a low vision optometrist would restore confidence in his sibling and he might provide special devices that would enable him to be independent.

Who Is Dr. Jacobi?

In his practice, Dr. Jacobi treats people who are partially sighted, or as optometrists call it: have low vision. Young patients approach his practice after they have been diagnosed with Ocular Albinism, Stargardt’s disease or Retinitis Pigmentosa, all of which can cause low or partial vision.

Dr. Jacobi helps these young people cope with their condition by finding the appropriate low vision glasses that maximize their vision. The objective is to enable them to do things that are of significant importance in their lives.

His First Driver’s License

Many young patients are particularly concerned with driving. This was also true for the twin brothers. Dr. Jacobi fitted the brother who had less sight with a pair of bioptic telescope glasses that would change his life.

At the age of 44, he was able to receive his driver’s license for the first time. He lives on his own without relying on the help of his brother or another person for daily tasks. Thanks to the glasses provided by Dr. Jacobi he lives a happier life today.

“There’s nothing more that can be done” does not exist in Dr. John Jacobi’s vocabulary. Serving the Livonia and Detroit, Michigan communities, Dr. Jacobi has changed lives for many patients with low vision. Retinal specialists often refer their patients – creating beneficial partnerships and targeted services for patients in need.

Providing Hope for Low Vision Patients

Macular Degeneration, Stargardt’s disease, Diabetic Retinopathy, or Retinitis Pigmentosa are some of the conditions that cause low vision. Anyone struggling with these conditions knows how debilitating it is to go about simple to even complex life activities.

This can be isolating and, in some cases, may lead to depression. As a member of the International Academy of Low Vision Specialists (IALVS), Dr. Jacobi offers ways in which these patients can regain function. He may prescribe bioptic telescope glasses for driving or prismatic glasses for reading, side vision awareness glasses, or other special low vision devices. His patients regain hope and happier life.

There’s Always More That Can be Done

There may not be a miracle cure for many patients, but there is still something that can be done. Dr. Jacobi has years of experience treating people who are partially sighted and given them back the ability to be independent, get a driver’s license, and do things that are meaningful in their lives.

Together, he urges retinal surgeons and doctors to complete that service loop for those who suffer from vision when. When they become happy and regain function, they have the courage and spirit to continue pushing themselves. This restoration of hope and regaining functionality creates circling back when they continue to seek treatment and support.

Where Can I Find A Low Vision Doctor?

woman reading with low vision

  • Reading your favorite books is difficult.
  • You squint a lot while watching TV.
  • When friends or family come to visit, you find it hard to clearly see their faces.
  • Driving is hard because the street signs, exit ramps, and other cars seem blurry.

Does this sound familiar? If you’ve experienced any of these situations, then you know how difficult it has become to do the daily tasks you used to enjoy. Whether your vision loss is a result of an injury, genetic condition, or eye disease, getting the right kind of eyecare is essential.

I Have An Eye Doctor. Why Do I Need A Low Vision Doctor?

Low vision care is about more than just glasses or contacts for better eyesight. It’s about a thorough understanding of your lifestyle and what’s important to you, and optimizing your remaining vision so you can get back to doing what you love.

While your regular eye doctor can give you general vision care and prescription eyeglasses or contact lenses, a low vision doctor looks at the whole picture. Their goal is to slow down the progression of vision loss and provide you with the right devices and glasses to enhance your remaining vision.

How Do I Find A Low Vision Doctor?

Elderly man having difficulty readingThe International Academy of Low Vision Specialists (IALVS) has a network of low vision doctors who are located all over the US and Canada. That means there is a low vision eye doctor who treats patients in your area, so you won’t have to go very far to receive top-quality care.

Our doctors undergo special training and have access to the latest research and technologies for low vision care. IALVS doctors are ready to help you live your best life, even with vision loss. Check out the complete doctor directory online.

How Quickly Will My Visual Activity Improve?

Treating your low vision is about giving you the right tools to maximize your vision for the everyday kinds of activities you enjoy. How quickly your visual activity will improve depends on how much loss of visual acuity you have and how quickly you see a low vision eye doctor.

It’s so important to see a low vision doctor as soon as possible. If you find that cooking isn’t as easy as it used to be, watching a movie gives you a headache, or reading a newspaper causes your eyes to feel tired, it’s time to talk to a low vision eye doctor. The sooner you seek treatment, the quicker we can give you the support you need.

If you or a loved one is experiencing any signs of vision loss – even mild ones – schedule an appointment with one of our low vision doctors.

Even if you’ve been told by another doctor that there’s nothing else to do, don’t give up hope. Talk to an IALVS low vision doctor – we can help you stay independent and live your life with the best vision possible.